So I've decided on the next meal that will be prepared on the smoker.  No it won't be pork ribs this time.  It won't be hamburgers either.  Yes the title says it all.  The next meal is salmon!  My main choice was made by going through our freezer and discovering we had recently bought a bag of salmon fillets.  Each fillet is a nice small cut of salmon vacuum sealed in its own separate bag.  I've removed the fillets from their nap sacks and placed them on a plate covered in plastic wrap.  At the moment they are in the refrigerator thawing out.  

I am attempting to make use of what I have at home and not go out and buy anything.  I've flipped through a few recipes so far trying to figure out what I would like to use for extra flavors.  I think the biggest question is whether or not I want to use a brine for the fish.  I found a recipe to brine for about 20 minutes and then dry off the fish and let it dry on a drying rack for two hours.  First thing that blew me away was the concept of letting fish sit on a counter for two hours.  Is that safe?  Before deciding on this recipe I realize I need to educate myself on the subject.  There was a word used that I have never heard before to explain the purpose of this curing time.  


"Pellicle (cooking), a skin or coating of proteins on the surface of meat, fish or poultry, which allow smoke to better adhere the surface of the meat durring the smoking process. Useful in all smoking applications and with any kind of animal protein, it is best used with fish where the flesh of, say, Salmon, forms a pellicle, the surface that will attract more smoke to adhere to it than would be the case if you had not used it: Without a pellicle; the fish would be inedibly dry from enough smoking to produce a tasty finished product. It is the pellicle which permits the transformation creating delectable Smoked salmon. "

Well, I guess that explains it!  Sometimes I have to hand it to Wikipedia for having just what I need to find out.  Always double check information though!  Never take a chance when food is concerned!  If you don't know just ask someone and then check up on the resources to make sure it is true and current information.  

So now we know that a pellicle is a barrier we want on our salmon that keeps the fish from drying out and absorbs smoky goodness.  So how do we get the pellicle?  

Curing.

There are main methods of curing that I have found.  Dry curing and wet curing (brine).  I'm going to spend the rest of my evening learning about the different brines and dry cures.  In the morning I will take what I think will be the best and most practical method and we can work on curing this salmon.  
 


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Nice info bro

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03/21/2012 23:04

Thanks for data

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03/26/2012 22:08

Thanks for information

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Nice info bro

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05/15/2012 03:10

Great info, thanks

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07/11/2012 16:04

Nice article dude

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